Section: Biology

A lone rooster sees a lot of all the hens in the flock, but the hen with the largest comb gets a bigger dose of sperm — and thus more chicks. Researchers in Sweden have now shown how the size of a hen’s comb is bound up with the ability to lay more eggs.


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The predictive power of invasive species hypotheses has declined over time, presenting a challenge to policy makers and resource managers who rely on accurate risk assessment – so reports a team of international scientists. The study was published in…


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Algae are high on the genetic engineering agenda as a potential source for biofuel, and they should be subjected to independent studies of any environmental risks that could be linked to cultivating algae for this purpose, two prominent researchers say.


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The cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a member of the herpesvirus family. Although most people carry CMV for life, it hardly ever makes them sick. Researchers have now unveiled long term consequences of the ongoing presence of CMV: later in life, more and more …


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Scientists have developed a way to switch fluorescent molecules on and off within aqueous environments, by strategically trapping the molecules inside water-soluble particles and controlling them with ultraviolet light.


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The hawkmoth, a natural petunia pollinator, spends less time on Petunia lines that offer less nectar as a reward.


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Pathogens can slip through leaf pores and begin infecting a plant. However, new research shows that this invasion is halted when a beneficial bacterium is present in the soil where the plant is rooted.


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Researchers have made a discovery that challenges a major theory in the field of coral reef ecology. The general assumption has been that the more flexible corals are, regarding which species of single-celled algae they host in coral tissues, the great…


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A certain protein significantly reduces the malaria-infected cells’ ability to squeeze through tiny channels compared to healthy cells.


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Evolving to become less aggressive could be key to saving the Tasmanian devil — famed for its ferocity — from extinction, research suggests. The species is being wiped out by Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), a fatal infectious cancer spread by bit…


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Certain small molecule chemicals that can disrupt quorum sensing in A. baumanni have been identified, providing a glimmer of hope that the stubborn pathogen can be tamed.


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Scientists have cracked a molecular code that may open the way to destroying or correcting defective gene products, such as those that cause genetic disorders in humans.


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