Section: Geology

Ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt’s Nile Delta document the region’s ancient droughts and fires, including a huge drought 4,200 years ago associated with the demise of Egypt’s Old Kingdom, the era known as the py…


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Debate over the origin of large-scale polygons (hundreds of meters to kilometers in diameter) on Mars remains active even after several decades of detailed observations. Similarity in geometric patterns on Mars and Earth has long captured the imaginati…


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The earth is shaken daily by strong earthquakes recorded by a number of seismic stations worldwide. Tectonic tremor, however, is a new type of seismic signal that seismologist started studying only within the last few years. Tremor is less hazardous th…


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Scientists have reached a milestone in describing how the northern lights work by way of a process called “magnetic reconnection.” The process is best imagined as untangling twisted strands of spaghetti.


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The growth of high topography on the Tibetan Plateau in Sichuan, China, began much earlier than previously thought, according to an international team of geologists who looked at mountain ranges along the eastern edge of the plateau.


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First time measurements of large-scale methane emissions have been taken from the extensive Arctic permafrost landscapes.


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A favorite theme of science fiction is “the portal” — an extraordinary opening in space or time that connects travelers to distant realms. A good portal is a shortcut, a guide, a door into the unknown. If only they actually existed. It turns out that …


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The current theory of continental drift provides a good model for understanding terrestrial processes through history. However, while plate tectonics is able to successfully shed light on processes up to three billion years ago, the theory isn’t suffic…


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A rare large-scale attempt to simulate volcanic eruptions will provide much-needed insight into one of Earth’s most powerful and mysterious natural disasters.


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A new study finds that very large earthquakes have been occurring relatively regularly on the Alpine Fault along the southwest coastline of New Zealand for at least 8,000 years.


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The world has gotten smaller and more accessible since applications like Google Earth became mainstream, says an expert. However, there is still a long way to go, and there are important steps to take to get there.


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The depths of Earth are anything but peaceful: large quantities of liquids carve their way through the rock as fluids, causing magma to form. Scientists have now shown that the fluids flow a lot faster through solid rock than previously assumed.


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